The idea is simple: collect post-use, single-use chopsticks from restaurants, thoroughly clean them, sanitize them at extremely high temperature and pressure, and use them to make high-quality accents for the consumer’s living space.

The original idea of Bryan Parks, an American who lived in China for several years. One day during lunch—which was of course being eaten with single-use chopsticks, Bryan rather nonchalantly asked his lunch partner how many chopsticks did he imagine were used per year considering China’s population size. This simple question would prove to be the catalyst for an innovative coupling of art and conservationism.
Research showed that literally billions of single-use chopsticks were consumed annually. The more shocking revelation was that it took, by some estimates, 25 million trees and bamboo plants to support that resource waste. In an effort to be more environmentally friendly, the colored chopsticks are all dyed using natural plants from China.
The future of single-use chopsticks and the impact to the world’s forests are unknown. Bryan genuinely hopes that one day he will no longer be able to make their recycled products as a result of heightened preservation efforts. However, until then, he hopes you will enjoy his exquisitely designed accents of enduring quality and ecological significance.

WEASEL & FITZ

2878 ST HWY 14, Madrid, NM 87010  505-474-4893


purveyors of curious thangs

Bryan Parks